Moving to a “better” school district for special education in Kansas

It can be overwhelming to move to a different district inbannerad01rolldice order to risk the chance to get a better education for our child.  Some parents go to this extreme.

But is this parent gambling?  Often, yes.  Hurdles may still exist.  Staff changes, school-board budgets emphasize varying priorities, and other variables exist.

This parent may have unknowingly allowed the former school district to make the schooling problem the parent’s problem.  School advocates are available to show the parent school’s problem and ways it can be effectively addressed.

Parents of student’s in Leavenworth school district, Osawotamie school district and  Shawnee Mission school districts used our advocate to learn about the system and make a difference for their child.

Call 816 865 6262

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Complete this form for our advocate to contact you:

©2018 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™ are  civil rights advocates. Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC advocates have special knowledge related to the problems of children with disabilities. We are not attorneys and do not give legal advice.  We do not represent parents or children.  We are not licensed to practice law in any state. Consult an attorney.  Nothing in this blog is to be considered legal advice.

We offer low-cost advocate (non-attorney) services.

  Set consult at http://bit.ly/iepconsult

 

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IEP meetings in Kansas not always beneficial for IEP student

Often public school staff will insist on an IEP meeting when the child’s experience is not agreeable to the student or parent.  Sometimes an IEP meeting arranged by the school 100_0669staff  is done to insure that the program will take place how the school staff prefer.. Decisions made in such an IEP meeting  may or may not be compliant with state regulations, nor appropriate for the student.

The unknowing parent trusts the school so easily go along with the idea and shows up for the IEP meeting.  Many times, an IEP meeting is not necessary.

For example, a high school student might want to take different classes than those assigned by the school counselor, or, changes to the sequence of classes.

Many accessibility issues often can be addressed without an IEP meeting; such as  participating in activities that all students participate (assemblies, bus rides, field trips, lunch time, etc.).

Schools sometimes tell parents

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“we don’t do that here”, or “that’s not available here”.   Parents can be assertive and e-mail in requests for services that are appropriate for the child who has an IEP, prior to an IEP meeting.  Often, the e-mail is more effective than an IEP meeting.

Parents need to be suspicious when told that an IEP student has to drop their special ed status in order to participate in regular ed classes.  Don’t be bamboozled!  Use our advocate to help you decide if your child is getting an appropriate program.

Contact our advocate:

Don’t be bamboozled!  Waiting and hoping for problems to go away allows our children to regress.  Hoping the problem will go away will only delay getting the problem addressed.  Waiting too long to address concerns may eliminate opportunities for correction.

We help parents at low-cost.  We help parents prepare for school meetings and also go to school meetings, manifestation determination hearings, and mediations.

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To set consult now, visit bit.ly/iepconsult

©2018 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™ are  civil rights advocates.  Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC advocates have special knowledge related to the problems of children with disabilities. We are not attorneys and do not give legal advice.  We do not represent parents or children.  We are not licensed to practice law in any state. Consult an attorney.  Nothing in this blog is to be considered legal advice. We offer low-cost service

 

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Fixing IEP problems at public school in Kansas

Let’s examine what parents attempt to  fix IEP problems. But is that really the issue that needs addressed? Perhaps it’s something more.

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Parents can have more control

Hypothetically, let’s say a child had needs/goals that went unaddressed or misaddressed for an entire school year, and as a result, the child now struggles more and has significantly regressed because of the public school’s failures.

Parents commonly pursue resolving this dilemma by:

  1. request another IEP meeting
  2. have meetings (not IEP meetings) with administratorsphotoboybooks
  3. call or take a friend to help
  4. call a case manager from a different system to go to a meeting

Did any of these help the child recover from the regression?

Other parents commonly pursue resolving this dilemma in these ways:

  1. contact a non-profit agency who trains parents
  2. contact a non-profit whose staffer or volunteer goes to an IEP meeting (sometimes waiting for weeks to get processed in a system)

Did any of these help the child recover from the regression?the-iep-center

Congress has avenues in place for parents to pursue correction and regression. There are ways to press a public school to be accountable, and perhaps offer to make up for their errors.  We know the steps parents can take to pursue letting the school “make up” for their errors.

Don’t be bamboozled!  Waiting and hoping for problems to go away allows our children to regress.  Begging in the meeting usually doesn’t work.  Hoping the problem will go away will only delay getting the problem addressed.  Waiting too long to address concerns eliminates opportunities for correction. Time is your enemy.

sign up for ezine:  bit.ly/IEPezine       facebook

Set a consult now!    bit.ly/iepconsult

Contact an advocate here:

 

 

Don’t be bamboozled!  Waiting and hoping for problems to go away allows our children to regress.  Hoping the problem will go away will only delay getting the problem addressed.  Waiting too long to address concerns may eliminate opportunities for correction.

We help parents at low-cost.  We help parents prepare for school meetings and also go to school meetings with parents.

©2018  Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™ provides information to parents regarding the problems of children with disabilities. We are civil rights advocates.   We are not attorneys and do not give advice. We are not licensed to practice law in any state. We do not represent anyone.  Consult an attorney.

 

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Intimidated and manipulated in IEP meeting in Kansas

Several educators surround the parent and present their plan for the child for the year, based on the school’s staff schedules and the number of other children who also need services.

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Parents can get more control

The parent asks for additional time in a service area and is quickly told that wouldn’t fit with the schedule.  Parent expresses concern that the child is getting left behind.

This was another “rubber stamped” meeting where the educators worked to just get through the meeting. As long as the parent is not assertive, the student may likely stagnate.

The March 2017 US Supreme Court decision was clear; children with IEPs are to have challenging objectives.

Advocates at TheIEPCenter.com™ help parents solve schooling problems by providing information so they can advocate for the child with special needs. Schools often don’t put plans into place legitimately unless a parent pursues action. Action can involve systems outside of the school district. Congress has many of these in place just for parents!  If the public doesn’t use them, then the “powers that be” assume there are no problems.

It’s what a parent doesn’t know that can deprive children of needed services.  We go to  school meetings with parents.AngelsenseRunnerJPEG

Don’t be bamboozled!  Waiting and hoping for problems to go away allows our children to regress.  Hoping the problem will go away will only delay getting the problem addressed.  Waiting too long to address concerns eliminates opportunities for correction.  Parents can have more control than they often realize!

sign up for ezine:  bit.ly/IEPezine       facebook

Contact  advocate here:

©2017 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™ are  civil rights advocates.  Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC advocates have special knowledge related to the problems of children with disabilities. We are not attorneys and do not give legal advice.  We do not represent parents or children.  We are not licensed to practice law in any state. Consult an attorney.  Nothing in this blog is to be considered legal advice. We offer low-cost services.

who to take to IEP meeting in Kansas

Parents:  you can invite people to attend your child’s IEP meeting.  We are not aware of any regulation that requires parents to inform the public school whom a parent brings.  Parents have more control over planning our child’s schooling than we often realize!

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One of the most overlooked people to invite is the paraprofessional(s) who work with the student.  Parents can notify the special ed administrator in advance that the parent is inviting the para.  Often the para is the person at the school who knows the child the best.

Districts’ sometimes place a heavy burden on paras, especially when the para has no skills related to the disability.  Paras usually go through a “training”, however it is often unrelated to our child’s special need(s). Often paras never see the IEP document.

Many times the para is not a good match for a student and problems arise.  Parents can find ways to privately talk to a para about what’s going on at school.

The more information a parent has before entering an IEP meeting, the better they can make informed decisions.  A parent’s  failure to ask the right questions in an IEP meeting may result in the child getting “left behind”.

If the public school district in Kansas is uncooperative, contact the advocates at The IEPCenter.com™ (parents can take an advocate as well).

Complete this form for an advocate to contact you:

 

 

©2017 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™ are advocates who have special knowledge related to the problems of children with disabilities.

We are civil rights advocates.    We are not attorneys and do not give legal advice.  We do not represent parents or children.  We are not licensed to practice law in any state. Consult an attorney.  Nothing in this blog is to be considered legal advice.

We offer non-attorney advocate services at low-cost.

Photo credit:  free  digital  photos. net

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