who to take to IEP meeting in Kansas

Parents:  you can invite people to attend your child’s IEP meeting.  We are not aware of any regulation that requires parents to inform the public school whom a parent brings.  Parents have more control over planning our child’s schooling than we often realize!

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One of the most overlooked people to invite is the paraprofessional(s) who work with the student.  Parents can notify the special ed administrator in advance that the parent is inviting the para.  Often the para is the person at the school who knows the child the best.

Districts’ sometimes place a heavy burden on paras, especially when the para has no skills related to the disability.  Paras usually go through a “training”, however it is often unrelated to our child’s special need(s). Often paras never see the IEP document.

Many times the para is not a good match for a student and problems arise.  Parents can find ways to privately talk to a para about what’s going on at school.

The more information a parent has before entering an IEP meeting, the better they can make informed decisions.  A parent’s  failure to ask the right questions in an IEP meeting may result in the child getting “left behind”.

If the public school district in Kansas is uncooperative, contact the advocates at The IEPCenter.com™ (parents can take an advocate as well).

Complete this form for an advocate to contact you:

 

 

©2017 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™ are advocates who have special knowledge related to the problems of children with disabilities.

We are civil rights advocates.    We are not attorneys and do not give legal advice.  We do not represent parents or children.  We are not licensed to practice law in any state. Consult an attorney.  Nothing in this blog is to be considered legal advice.

We offer non-attorney advocate services at low-cost.

Photo credit:  free  digital  photos. net

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Kansas special ed student with ADHD, anxiety and depression

Student struggles continuously in social situations, especially at recess and unstructured settings (library, lunch); sometimes picked on by other children and teased at recess.

Parents have done their best over the years and child sees outside psychological rsz_withbook-300x198boyinlibraryprofessional regularly.  That “system” has provided the parents with terms like “ADHD”, “depression”, “anxiety”.

Many times in the public school “system”, these children are found eligible for special education under an eligibility category called “Other Health Impaired” (OHI).  Other students may be eligible for accommodations under a “504” plan.

However, in the mainstream, some of these children are considered to be affected by “Asperger Syndrome”.  Wikipedia provides a definition worth pondering. Multiple, beneficial resources of information exist for parents and schools of these children.

AngelsenseRunnerJPEG  Don’t let your child miss out on lifetime skills! Many IEP teams don’t know to include these into the child’s program.  The advocates at The IEP Center™ help parents deal with the school for our kids’ with special needs.

Advocates at The IEP Center help parents solve IEP problems by providing information so they can advocate for the child with special needs at the public school.  Don’t be bamboozled!  Waiting and hoping for problems to go away allows our children to regress.  Hoping the problem will go away will only delay the problem.

Never go alone to an IEP meeting; our advocates are available!  913-210-1200

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Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™ provides information to parents regarding the problems of children with disabilities. We are civil rights advocates for parents of children with disabilities.   We are not attorneys and do not give advice.  Consult an attorney. We are not licensed to practice law in any state.

We help parents at low-cost.  We help parents prepare for school meetings and also go to mediation and IEP meetings with parents.

©2016 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™