School wants parent to do work with student at home. IEP meeting

The parent was overwhelmed by caring for the child before we even entered the IEP meeting.  Discussion developed and some of the related service personnel insisted that the mother do a quantity of exercises with the child at home. I indicated that the parent was here at the meeting to learn what the school plans to do for the child for the upcoming year; this got discussion back on track.

Do you feel manipulated in IEP meetings? Our advocates are aware how parents may be bamboozled in IEP meetings and not even realize it!   It’s important for parents to set the tone of the relationship with the school early on.  Parents should be respected; not manipulated. WIth an advocate at your side, the school will see you are serious about your child’s education and expect the school to play their role.

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Parents in Kansas who need help dealing with the public school for their child with an IEP can consult with a professional special education advocate at The IEP Center.   Advocates also help parents when the parent wants an advocate to go to a meeting at the school with them!  Never go alone.

Parents often need to work to make sure the pubic school system isn’t failing their child.  Passing grades doesn’t necessarily mean your child is learning.

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Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center provides information to parents regarding the problems of children with disabilities.  We are not attorneys and do not give advice.  Consult an attorney.

We help parents at low-cost.

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Early Childhood Program in Kansas observed by parent is questionable

Parent observed her child in the early childhood program where she was told high school students would be instructing her child. As the months passed, parent never saw any high school students work with her child. She again observed and saw her child not getting any interaction. She contacted the building principal who indicated she would communicate the concern to staff.  No changes were made to the child’s program. the-iep-center

What programming is your child getting in Kansas early childhood facilities?  Is it actually occurring?

There are avenues to pursue to address this; it may be most effective if a parent pursues correction before regression occurs. Delay allows problems to get worse.  Public schools aren’t eager to offer “make-up” for their failures and usually don’t.  The parent is the IEP monitor!rsz_two-together-129219-300x203

Advocates at the iep center help parents solve IEP problems by providing information so they can advocate for the child with special needs.  Don’t be bamboozled! We can go to school meetings with the parent.

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Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center provides information to parents regarding the problems of children with disabilities.  We are not attorneys and do not give advice.  Consult an attorney.

SEPAL provides advocate services at low cost.

©2015 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC

Kansas parents enroll IEP students

As parents in Kansas enroll their IEP student for school year 2015-16, they may not be aware school’s  staff doesn’t really understand the needs of the child.  This is why the Congress put the IEP process into place and the opportunity for a parent to trigger evaluations.the-iep-center (800x640)

Parents can check to see how many years’ have passed since the school last did a COMPLETE evaluation of the child to assess all areas of SUSPECTED disability.  Parents can request the school do this after one year has passed.  Parents can submit their private evaluations from outside professionals at any time to the school.

Also, parents can trigger the school to pay for outside evaluations, called “Independent Educational Evaluations”.  There are parameters for this including that it is triggered by the parent as a result of the parent’s disagreement with the evaluation conducted by the school district.

Independent Educational Evaluations (IEE) often prove helpful to both the student and staff since the IEE often points out areas that need to be addressed.NICHCYphotomagnifyglass3-198x300

Delays in taking action to get support for a child may have ramifications.  It is usually beneficial if the parent pursues correction early since issues may snowball into larger problems.

Parents in Kansas who need help dealing with the public school for their child with an IEP can consult with a professional special education advocate at The IEP Center.   Advocates also help parents when the parent wants an advocate to go to a meeting at the school with them!  Never go alone.

Parents often need to work to make sure the pubic school system isn’t failing their child.  Passing grades doesn’t necessarily mean your child is learning.

sign up for ezine:  bit.ly/IEPezine

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Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center provides information to parents regarding the problems of children with disabilities.  We are not attorneys and do not give advice.  Consult an attorney.

We help parents at low-cost.

©2015 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC

theiepcenter.com is a trademark of the Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC

Contact an advocate here:

IEP student suspended; School Advocate sees in Spring

Over the years I’ve noticed  IEP students with behaviors being suspended more frequently at the month or so before the end of the school year. the-iep-center

A few years back our U.S. Congress gave school districts the ability to suspend students with IEPs up to ten school days during a school year.

In the spring, patience can wear thin and school staffer’s might need a break from managing behaviors of the child who is a challenge.  So why not find a reason to suspend the student?  They may suspend the student who has not yet been suspended for up to ten days during that school term.  These school staffers may have no idea that a multi-day suspension might be the breaking point for a family? a marriage? income? rsz_prettyteacher2-vert-201x300smirk

Parent’s can be proactive to puruse an appropriate behavior plan exists within the IEP for a student.

Don’t be bamboozled!   Parents who are serious about their child’s schooling and tired of being bamboozled use advocates at The IEP Center.

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Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center are not attorneys and do not give legal advice.  We do not give advice; we give information about the problems of children with special needs. We do not represent anyone. Consult an attorney.

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IEP Advocate at IEP meetings

Parents will want to consider these tips when preparing for an IEP meeting for their child at the public school:

1. Never go alone; always take someone with you. It’s important to have another set of eyes and ears. Its tough to be discussing your own child’s needs. Someone else can help you pick up on what is going on. You can also take those who know your child; babysitters, fellow classmates, relatives.

2. Arrange weeks in advance for an advocate to go with you. Schools often become defensive if you take an attorney; find an advocate who can support you at a grassroots level. This way, the advocate can do the legwork and, if it ends up that you use an attorney later, the advocate will have prepped the scenario.

3. Have your requests ready. Have a prepared list ready to give to the “IEP Team” that specifys your child’s needs, strengths and deficits. If you want your child to learn keyboarding, mention he can now type letters a,s,d on the keyboard. If you want him to learn how to velcro close his shoes, mention he can now put on one shoe. An IEP advocate can help you prepare this list. 4. Do some research. Find out about the programs offered by the school; see if the “program” exists. Look on the internet about the data the state dept of education has about your school district. Ask the state dept of education for copies of “child complaints” filed related to your school district. Talk to children who attend at that school and what they see happening. Search on the internet for support groups in your school district; it can be amazing to learn what other parents in your area know about the schools. They may refer to you an advocate they used.

5. Take someone to the meeting who will take notes; someone who knows shorthand is a good choice. Often a school district person is taking their own notes; ask for a copy of theirs at the end of the meeting. If they refuse to give you a copy, hand them a handwritten request that is dated and signed.

6. If testing/evaluation is to be discussed, be sure to know which kinds of tests were done by the school in the past so that they can be done again; this way you can compare your child’s progress in a consistent manner. If they come up with different “brands” of tests, it is problematic later when trying to see your child’s performance. An IEP advocate can help you figure this out.

7. There is no duty on the part of the parent to let the school know they are going to bring an advocate to the IEP meeting. Some schools put up a brick wall if they learn an advocate is coming. IEP Advocates play a crucial role in helping parents prepare for an IEP meeting; don’t hesistate to consult with one well in advance of any upcoming school meeting.

I am not attorney; this is not intended to be advice.

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