Intimidated and manipulated in IEP meeting in Kansas

Several educators surround the parent and present their plan for the child for the year, based on the school’s staff schedules and the number of other children who also need services.

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Parents can get more control

The parent asks for additional time in a service area and is quickly told that wouldn’t fit with the schedule.  Parent expresses concern that the child is getting left behind.

This was another “rubber stamped” meeting where the educators worked to just get through the meeting. As long as the parent is not assertive, the student may likely stagnate.

The March 2017 US Supreme Court decision was clear; children with IEPs are to have challenging objectives.

Advocates at TheIEPCenter.com™ help parents solve schooling problems by providing information so they can advocate for the child with special needs. Schools often don’t put plans into place legitimately unless a parent pursues action. Action can involve systems outside of the school district. Congress has many of these in place just for parents!  If the public doesn’t use them, then the “powers that be” assume there are no problems.

It’s what a parent doesn’t know that can deprive children of needed services.  We go to  school meetings with parents.AngelsenseRunnerJPEG

Don’t be bamboozled!  Waiting and hoping for problems to go away allows our children to regress.  Hoping the problem will go away will only delay getting the problem addressed.  Waiting too long to address concerns eliminates opportunities for correction.  Parents can have more control than they often realize!

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©2017 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™ are  civil rights advocates.  Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC advocates have special knowledge related to the problems of children with disabilities. We are not attorneys and do not give legal advice.  We do not represent parents or children.  We are not licensed to practice law in any state. Consult an attorney.  Nothing in this blog is to be considered legal advice. We offer low-cost services.

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who to take to IEP meeting in Kansas

Parents:  you can invite people to attend your child’s IEP meeting.  We are not aware of any regulation that requires parents to inform the public school whom a parent brings.  Parents have more control over planning our child’s schooling than we often realize!

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One of the most overlooked people to invite is the paraprofessional(s) who work with the student.  Parents can notify the special ed administrator in advance that the parent is inviting the para.  Often the para is the person at the school who knows the child the best.

Districts’ sometimes place a heavy burden on paras, especially when the para has no skills related to the disability.  Paras usually go through a “training”, however it is often unrelated to our child’s special need(s). Often paras never see the IEP document.

Many times the para is not a good match for a student and problems arise.  Parents can find ways to privately talk to a para about what’s going on at school.

The more information a parent has before entering an IEP meeting, the better they can make informed decisions.  A parent’s  failure to ask the right questions in an IEP meeting may result in the child getting “left behind”.

If the public school district in Kansas is uncooperative, contact the advocates at The IEPCenter.com™ (parents can take an advocate as well).

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©2017 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™ are advocates who have special knowledge related to the problems of children with disabilities.

We are civil rights advocates.    We are not attorneys and do not give legal advice.  We do not represent parents or children.  We are not licensed to practice law in any state. Consult an attorney.  Nothing in this blog is to be considered legal advice.

We offer non-attorney advocate services at low-cost.

Photo credit:  free  digital  photos. net

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Choosing education advocate for special ed students in Kansas

Parents continue to “hope” that things will work out in multiple IEP meetings when they attend alone, yet  years pass.  Parents often get stuck when they don’t have the information necessary to work the “system”.  Unable to address the hidden agenda in school meetings, the child gets left behind.

rsz_meeting7Taking an advocate to an IEP meeting is often helpful. But which advocate?

First, a parent must understand an independent advocate is different from case managers, mentors and “parent trainers” who have expertise in their respective areas but usually do not exclusively work in the special education  arena.  This can be compared to taking a dentist with you for support when you are having open heart surgery.  They might go to a meeting for free; but remember the saying “you get what you pay for”. There are pitfalls these folks aren’t aware.  Many of them inadvertently help the school along.  Ask who pays for their involvement.   They may leave the IEP believing changes were made for the better; yet that day’s battle was won but the war was lost.AngelsenseRunnerJPEG

Second, other folks represent themselves as an “advocate” yet lack experience.  Real experience by an accomplished advocate is essential for the parent who needs information about complex situations.  Also, membership in national professional advocate associations is an indicator the person has more background and keeps current. We are not the KSDE-trained education advocates; don’t be confused. We are civil rights advocates.

Also, the writer of this blog also has a teaching certificate, taught in both public and private schools,  and testified to the legislature about the need for change in the special ed system in Missouri resulting in due process reform.  Ask your advocate the extent of their commitment to systemic change in the state. She keeps current in cutting-edge parent strategies and is a member of a national organization since 1999. She has previous experience working in a law firm which represented parents.  She served as a due process hearing panel member from 1996-2013.   Check out our website for more information about this advocate.

Using an independent professional advocate can provide the information that allows a parent to cut through the confusion presented by the IEP team and spare months of frustration and absences from employment.  IEP teams are often ignorant about the possibilities for a student.  Delay is problematic.  In Kansas call 913 210 1200.

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Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC advocates have special knowledge related to the problems of children with disabilities. We are civil rights advocates.  We offer low-cost services.

 

©2017 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™ are not attorneys and do not give legal advice.  We do not represent parents or children.  We are not licensed to practice law in any state. Consult an attorney.  Nothing in this blog is to be considered legal advice.

Schools don’t test for ADHD in Kansas

Parents ask the public school for help for their child who is struggling.  The child has a diagnoses from a medical professional of ADHD and has provided that document to the school.

The school staff tells the parent the school doesn’t test kids for ADHD, and, they don’t have a program for kids with ADHD.  This is true, however, students with significant ADHD might qualify for “special education” under a category called “Other Health Impaired”.   This is often referred to as “OHI”.  This is within the process known as “special education under the IDEA”.

Another approach which parents choose is separate from the IDEA process. Some students who have significant ADHD may qualify for a “504 accommodation plan” under a civil rights law.  Most school districts don’t make this known and have experienced developing few of these plans. Parents may get a blank stare from school personnel when a parent requests a 504 accommodation plan.

504 accommodation plans are to allow for students to not be penalized since the student is different from other students. I have helped parents deal with this scenario multiple times.

Advocate Marilyn McClure,

theiepcenter.com

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Copyright 2016 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center   SEPAL helps parents by providing information and advocate services to parents regarding their children’s civil rights in the public schools.  These services are offered at low cost.

 

We are not attorneys and do not give legal advice.  We do not represent parents or students. Consult an attorney.